New Piccadilly

New Piccadilly, 8 Denman Street, City of Westminster, London W1, 2003 • This Italian institution was so famous I thought plenty of other people would record it (and I was right – there’s a Flickr group here), so never got a decent shot of the outside, or even attempted the inside, which was an overwhelmingly retro yellow formica time capsule. Here it is in its latter days; it closed for redevelopment in 2007 and is unrecognisable now. According to the excellent article here, Lorenzo Marioni, the proprietor for 50 years, took away or destroyed all traces before retiring to Italy. I have to say, the few times I ate there, the food and coffee were terrible, they couldn’t even make a decent omelette. You can get the idea from the scrawled sign in the window offering “try our signature dish of jungli hot chicken curry & eggs with rice £6″.

New Piccadilly

 

 

New Piccadilly

New Piccadilly

The 3 Crowns

The 3 Crowns, 8 East Road, Borough of Hackney, London N1, 2013 • Nicely-tiled Shoreditch pub which appears to have been rescued by hipsters in mid-destruction. There’s a picture of how it looked before its ‘oldvamp’ here – it’s far nicer now. According to the pub’s website, ‘The 3 Crowns’ is the correct wording, though most sub-editors would disagree (and note cryptic new name sign, three badly-drawn crowns). 

The 3 Crowns

The 3 Crowns

The 3 Crowns

Kenilworth Castle

Kenilworth Castle, 104 St Anns Road, Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, London W11, 2002 • Unusual post-war council estate pub on the fringes of posh Holland Park. By 2012 it was painted blue and much more shabby, with its red prow fallen off. One disparaging reviewer described it in 2011 as “like something from The Sweeney”. More recently it’s been under new management and getting the thumbs up, albeit still “like going back in time 30-40 years ago”.

Kenilworth Castle

Kenilworth Castle

Kenilworth Castle

Bridge Hotel

Bridge Hotel, Castle Garth, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 2013 • Forbidding but fantastic pub built into Newcastle’s old town walls and perched high above the river Tyne, bracketed by two of the city’s spectacular bridges. Note tiled doorstep and interesting windows, my photos don’t do justice the quality of late afternoon light through these. May need to go back…

Bridge Hotel

Bridge Hotel

Bridge Hotel

F.P. Turner & Sons (Five Star Nails)

F.P. Turner & Sons (Five Star Nails), 31 Victoria Road, Surbiton, Surrey, 2014 • An old sign kept on from a jeweller’s, established 1825 (though not at this premises, where they’d been for 15 years). F.P. Turner’s final days can be seen on Google street view here, at which point they were receiving very unflattering reviews. There’s an article about their 2013 closure here.

 

F.P. Turner & Sons (Five Star Nails)

Maestro Records, Mobiles Phone

Maestro Records, Mobiles Phone, 61 Rye Lane, Borough of Southwark, London SE15, 2010 • Poignant collision of old and new tech divided by a fat conductor, in a typically ruinous Peckham building. Note the mysterious non-Latin script “CAY” surtitle, also found here. Unexpectedly, Maestro (actually a reggae outlet, despite the classical pretensions) lived on and appeared to prosper, while Mobiles Phone became the also-interestingly-named Salem Beauty.

Maestro Records, Mobiles Phone

Silver and Edgington

Silver and Edgington, 18 Arwenack Street, Falmouth, Cornwall, 2010 • I caught Falmouth’s premier camping-cum-tailoring emporium just on its way out – wish I’d witnessed it in its tents-and-flags glory days (although maybe I did – I often visited Falmouth as a child). The sign’s black sobriety was soon replaced by the gaudy blobbiness of Kernow Toymaster.

Silver and Edgington

Silver and Edgington

Silver and Edgington