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Co-op Mosaic (BHS)

Co-op Mosaic (BHS), 32-38 Jameson Street, Kingston upon Hull, 2013 Immense 1963 “three ships” mural by Alan Boyson, on what was then a super-duper new Co-Op building. There’s a huge and beautiful fish mosaic by him inside, too, only recently rediscovered. The building proved too big for the Co-Op, so they later sold some off to other businesses – which means the thee ships now decorate BHS. More info here and here.

Co-op Mosaic (BHS)

Co-op Mosaic (BHS)

Co-op Mosaic (BHS)

8 replies »

  1. I’d say all things considered, the rest of the building is pants but the mural would be pretty amazing as part of any replacement, however badly designed and modish. Big co-op supermarket near us closing next week, they’ve never really known what to do with it since it opened in the early 1990s, shame really. Will be a Waitrose, I always thought there was something very sound and reassuring about the café overlooking the distribution depot where you could get coffee for 79p and sandwiches for the same price as on the shop floor!

    • It’s actually quite a good building (if you like 60s architecture) as we shall see tomorrow. But admittedly not looking its best. Sorry to hear about your local Co-op, although I daresay there will be plenty of people happy it’s becoming a Waitrose.

  2. I really do like those kind of buildings to be honest, the windows are quite interesting on a 2nd look, I suppose it just too-quickly reminded me of Broadmead in Bristol. There, I’d say the bulk of the slightly more interesting stuff has long been torn down for The Galleries and more again for Cabot Circus etc… and only the most unimaginative blocks were left, I think anyway. Here’s a nice but also slightly useless aerial pic courtesy of Wikipedia – http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/33/Bristol.broadmead.balloon.arp.jpg

    • I like some of the 1960s buildings in Broadmead so I wish I had seen some of these “better” ones. The first time I ever went to Bristol was 2006 and most of it seemed razed to the ground, I guess they were just starting on Cabot Circus (hence we got totally lost as the satnav kept trying to send us through the monster building site). Anyway, I wish I had visited much earlier, and seen what it used to look like. The Galleries is horrible, but Cabot Circus is OK, shopping malls seem to be improving. I like the brutalist bit of Bristol with all those weird concrete walkways, but that will be knocked down soon – I daresay most will be glad to see it go! I have to say, I think Bristol is a wonderful place, it has a bit of everything, from rioty grunge to super-posh with a harbour inbetween.

      • Definitely a great place, no question, if it wasn’t just 20 minutes away from us by train I’d go mad! Until a few years ago you could still see many isolated parts of the walkways to nowhere, the escalators that haven’t moved in about 25 years still loom over the roundabout by the Evening Post but even the iconic press hall has been demolished now. Until about 10 years ago the rather fatigue inducingly titled “Design Control in Postwar Bristol, 1940-90 – John V. Punter” doubled up as a handy thrillseekers guide to the various triumphs and mistakes over the years, yours for just 36p at Amazon right now, I’m sure I’ve mentioned it before anyway, but not at these low, low, prices(!). It beats any of the more recent fan fiction hands down.

      • Thanks for the book tip – seriously! I shall seek it out. I enjoy using the works of Owen Hatherley (leftie youngish architecture critic) and the Crap Towns series as reference.

  3. Not heard of him – have just had a look. ‘Supergentrification’ indeed, like it. The book is ace and I paid a ‘sale price’ £25 for it in the mid 90s!

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